Innovative 7000T Laptop Arm: Improve your laptop ergonomics.

Our Everyday Price: $250.25
Sale Price: 5% off
Get Instant Coupon







Merchant Services

FacebookTwitter
Desktop Computing: Problems and Solutions

Desktop Computing: Problems and Solutions

by Shelby Robinson
©Shelby Robinson
www.ergopro.com
March, 2009

Eyes- Blurry Vision & Sore, Dry, Tired Eyes

  • Use a Monitor Arm or Monitor Riser to position your monitor about arms' length away, 18-24".
  • Have your monitor perpendicular to the window or you can close or tilt the blinds to reduce reflection & glare.
  • Tilt your monitor to reduce reflections.
  • If you have a fluorescent bulb above you, try to position yourself so that you are parallel to the length of the bulb to keep light from reflecting in your eyes.
  • Make sure your monitors' contrast & brightness are adjusted properly to increase clarity.
  • A separate task light can provide extra light where it's most needed.
  • When working on your computer, reduce the lighting level by about 1/2 of that used for reading.
  • Get an anti-glare filter for your monitor to reduce glare & reflection or try a monitor hood to block out direct light.
  • To prevent your eyes from needing to refocus, have your documents at the same level as your monitor; use a Document Holder.
  • Get an Adjustable Height Table to bring your work surface to the proper level.
  • Get a deeper desk. Too shallow a desk will force you to use your monitor too close to your eyes.
  • Replace your large monitor with a flat panel model so you have more flexibility in where it's placed.
  • Remember to blink frequently to moisturize your eyes.
  • Give your eyes periodic rest breaks by cupping or closing them & focusing on distant objects.

Arm, Neck, and Shoulder Pain

  • The top of your monitor should be at, or slightly below, eye level.
  • Place your monitor directly in front of you to encourage a neutral neck & head position.
  • Get a Monitor Riser or Monitor Arm to get your monitor up to the correct height.
  • Place your keyboard so that it is centered in line with your monitor.
  • Use a Keyboard Tray and Arm to get your keyboard 1 1/2-2" lower than your desktop.
  • As an alternative, try a mouse arm like our Dexterity Platform to lower your mousing surface to the arms of your chair.
  • Have your documents at the same level as your monitor; use a Document Holder.
  • Don't cradle your phone between your head & shoulder; use a headset or speakerphone.
  • Check your chair & desk height.  Your desktop surface should be 1 1/2"-2" higher than typing height so your forearms can comfortably rest on your desktop while reading and writing. Use a Keyboard Tray and Arm to get your arms at a 90º to 120º angle while typing.  Adjustable Height Tables, Ergonomic Office Chairs, & Armrests can be a big help. As an alternative, try a mouse arm such as our Dexterity Platform to lower your mousing surface to the arms of your chair.
  • Be sure to sit all the way back in your chair with your low back touching the backrest. And make sure your chair is adjusted correctly.
  • If your armrests keep you from getting close to your keyboard, remove them.
  • Place your mouse right next to your keyboard to keep your arms close to your body.
  • Use an Ergonomic Keyboard or a keyboard without a numeric keypad, to get your mouse close to your keyboard.
  • If you are right-handed, get a keyboard with a keypad on the left, like our Evoluent Mouse Friendly Keyboard.
  • Place items you use frequently within easy reach; get out of your chair or pivot it to reach items that are further away- don't strain!
  • Rest your arms at your sides for 15 seconds, do some shoulder shrugs, & rotate your neck every 15 minutes.
  • Try our Stretch Break Softtware to remind you to take breaks
  • Stand up, walk around, breathe deeply, & drink some water every hour.

Repetetive Stress Injury (RSI)- Wrist Pain & Numbness, Tingling in Fingers & Arms

  • Use an Ergonomic Mouse to reduce strain & align your hand, arm, & shoulder correctly.
  • Check your mousing & typing position. Use a Keyboard Tray and Arm to get your keyboard 1 1/2"-2" lower than desk height so your arms can be at a comfortable 90° to 120° angle (tilted downwards slightly).
  • As an alternative, try a mouse arm like our Dexterity Platform to lower your mousing surface to the arms of your chair.
  • Keep your wrists straight & fingers arched a bit while typing. Adjustable Height Tables, Ergonomic Office Chairs, & Armrests can be a big help.
  • Tilt your keyboard backwards slightly to keep your wrists in a neutral position.
  • Place your mouse right next to your keyboard to keep your arms close to your body.
  • Try not to plant your wrist & hands on your wrist rest; float your hands across the keys.
  • Try our Stretch Break Softtware to remind you to take breaks
  • Rest your arms at your sides for 15 seconds, do some shoulder shrugs, & rotate your neck every 15 minutes.
  • Stand up, walk around, breathe deeply, & drink some water every hour.

Low Back Pain

  • Use an Ergonomic Office Chair & make sure the backrest supports your low back
  • Use a back & seat cushion if your chair is not adjustable.
  • Use a Footrest for added comfort.
  • Try our Stretch Break Softtware to remind you to take breaks
  •  Place items you use frequently within easy reach; get out of your chair or pivot it to reach items that are further away- don't strain!
  • Stand up, walk around, breathe deeply, & drink some water every hour.

Leg Pain

  • Use an Ergonomic Office Chair & make sure your legs are at a right angle with your knees slightly lower than your hips & your feet are resting comfortably.
  • Use a Footrest for added comfort.
  • Use a back & seat cushion if your chair is not adjustable.
  • Try our Stretch Break Softtware to remind you to take breaks.
  • Stand up, walk around, breathe deeply, drink some water every hour, and get outside when possible.

Reprint instructions:

You may reprint ths entire article if you leave all links in place and do not modify the content.
2009 Ergopro.com-888-311-0332


*ErgoPro.com provides information and products as aids to understanding and addressing care of the human frame, ergonomics and related ailments. Such offerings should not be considered medical advice or substitutes for the recommendations of an attending physician or other health care professional, nor as specific recommendation or endorsement of any procedure, therapy, treatment or product.